All Courses

L ARCH 300 | Introductory Landscape Architecture Studio
[Syllabi]
Introduction to the field of landscape architecture and the making of landscape architecture design. Discussion of social space, place identities, public realm, urban ecology and sustainability, and public art. Development of beginning skills in site and behavioral observations, design conceptualization and visual and verbal communications. Required for BLA admission.

L ARCH 301 | Design Foundation Studio
[Syllabi]
Introduces site planning and design process, principles, and skills through experiential learning. Focusing on basic design principles, two and three dimensional design explorations are undertaken that build a vocabulary of forms for site-based design. Studio activities are designed to foster skills in design process, form language, self-awareness and creativity, group dynamics, and organization. Majors only.

L ARCH 302 | Site Design in the Urban Context
[Syllabi]
This studio explores the application of design ideas and principles to urban sites. Theory and research informing the design of human environments, and lessons from urban and ecological design precedents are implemented in the design of plazas, urban parks, waterfronts, streets, campus and commercial areas and historical sites. Students work at a variety of scales to promote awareness of context as well as to practice detailed design. Major only.

L ARCH 303 Natural Processes in Design
[Syllabi]
Project design studies related to natural systems. Emphasis is placed on the innovative use of historical landscape forms to achieve more sustainable landscape performance, using both biophysical and social criteria to define sustainability. Computer mapping applications are introduced.

L ARCH 331 | Landscape Construction (Grading & Drainage)
[Syllabi]
Basic course in site engineering, correlating the design and technical aspects of site development and suitability. Grading, drainage, circulation requirements and alignment, organization concepts relative to landscape resources, site evaluation, utilization and protection, and building and site program analysis and coordination.

L ARCH 332 | Landscape Construction (Materials and Methods)
[Syllabi]
This introductory course, the second of three in the construction sequence, will focus on the traditional and innovative use of materials many of which offer more sustainable options. Students will learn construction methodologies and of layout, detail development, construction administration, cost estimating and specifications. The use of AutoCAD will be encouraged. This course will prepare students for some of the skills required in LARC 433.

L ARCH 341 | Site Planning
[Syllabi]
Introduces urban ecological design issues of “good” site planning process, principles and methods. Linked with LARC 301, it addresses planning for people, natural systems in place-making, design for movement with varied land uses. Methods include readings, discussions, presentations, campus walks, case studies, graphic and written assignments. Juniors+ only, limited.

L ARCH 352 | History of Landscape Architecture
[Syllabi]
This course is the first of two required courses in landscape history. It introduces students to the history of landscape architecture as the designed transformation of landscapes from Mesopotamia and Egypt through 19th century Europe and USA. The focus is on the intersection of physical and biological landscape processes, with cultural, social and political processes, and design theories and techniques in shaping the design of gardens, and public spaces, such as squares and parks. Non-western cultures, including China, Japan and the Islamic world are included as a counterpoint to the principal examination of western landscape design beginning in Classical Greece. This course is designed to place landscape architecture in a broad cultural and social context and develop skills in critical thinking and writing. Methods include, readings, assigned essays, midterm slide identification examination, term paper, and final examination. Open to non-majors. Required for BLA admission.

L ARCH 353 | History of Modern Landscape Architecture
[Syllabi]
This course is the second of two required courses in the history of landscape architecture. Students are introduced to the history of landscape architecture as an art, discipline and profession in the U.S.A. in the 20th century. Landscape design in Europe, Japan, and South America is used as a counterpoint. The focus is on the intersection of landscape processes and prevailing social and economic, political and cultural factors and design theories and technical in shaping design practice. The rise of the profession of landscape architecture is examined in relationship to other design professions, such as Architecture and City Planning, and the Fine Arts, especially Painting and Sculpture. This course is designed to place landscape architecture in a broad cultural and social context and develop skills in critical thinking and writing. Methods include, readings, assigned essays, midterm slide identification examination, term paper, and final examination. Majors and non-majors. Required for BLA admission.

L ARCH 361 | Human Experience of Place
[Syllabi]
Interdisciplinary approaches to exploring the reciprocal relationship between people and the landscapes of everyday life. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities and mini-projects, students study place attachment, relationships to nature, environmental attitudes and perception, personal space, territoriality, urban public space, diversity, participation and the politics of space. Open to non-majors.

L ARCH 363 | Ecological Design and Planning
[Syllabi]
Introduction to landscape ecological theory applied to urban environments. Comparison of different vocabularies used to describe landscape structure and function, from the fields of landscape design, urban design and biology. Discussion of design theories that have sought to re-center landscape planning and design around the goal of achieving ecological sustainability.

L ARCH 402 | Neighborhood Design Studio
[Syllabi]
Interdisciplinary studio at neighborhood and site scales, mixed-use. Incorporates urban design theory, precedents, neighborhood/project issues, and community clients. Skills in neighborhood and site analysis, programming, and design are developed in groups and individually. Methods include readings, research, critiques, field studies, and graphic, written and verbal presentations. Majors, non-majors by instructor’s permission.

L ARCH 403 | Cultural Landscape Studio
[Syllabus Autumn 08]
Studies of the landscape at various scales and in diversified contexts. Offers better understanding of visual components of landscapes, designer’s capacity to evaluate and change these components, and resultant interaction with, and effect on, landscape user.

L ARCH 411 | Landscape Graphics
[Syllabi]
The course introduces fundamental hand-drawn graphic conventions, drawing techniques and media used in environmental design. The emphasis is on building drawing and media skills that support design ability development. The course is taught with a variety of techniques including lectures, demonstrations, display of examples, drawing from slides, and in class workshops. Majors only.

L ARCH 433 | Design Integration for Sustainable Site Construction
[Syllabi]
Third in the series of construction synthesis courses, this course relates the ecological health of natural systems to design and engineering approaches, design documentation, and construction practices of large-scale landscapes. It focuses on methods and implications of stormwater controls and treatments, and the skills required to design landscape-based stormwater facilities and wetlands. Materials and methods of sustainable large-scale landscape construction are presented, such as tree and soil protection, erosion control, paving, drainage structures, and bioengineering techniques, and application of “green” technologies. The landscape architect’s skill in preparing drawings and specifications and his/her role during bidding and construction is emphasized. In this studio course students produce a construction drawing set for a large-scale restoration project of their own design. Majors only.

L ARCH 440 | Computers in Landscape Architecture
[Syllabi]
Laboratory, lecture, and demonstration classes to introduce software applications specific to required landscape architecture courses.

L ARCH 441 | Computers in Landscape Architecture II
[Syllabi]
Second of the sequence in digital media for landscape architecture.

L ARCH 452 | History of Urban Landscapes
[Syllabi]
Introduces the history of urban design as the design of public space in cities. This course is structured as a comparative survey of non-western cultures, including China, Japan, the Islamic world, and Pre-Columbian countries and the western world from the Pre-Classical period through the nineteenth century in Europe and USA. Non-western traditions are examined through critical study of the intersection of landscape processes, cultural values, social, economic, political processes, with design theories and technical processes. Fundamental urban form types used to examine western urban patterns and spatial character as acts of design. Emphasis given to the degree to which these creative acts were pragmatic practices or works of art.

L ARCH 473 | Professional Practice
[Syllabi]
Addresses career strategies, practice skills and issues, professional ethics and personal values of urban ecological design. Guest practitioners discuss effective communication, office and project management, project construction, reflective practice and career alternatives. Methods include readings, discussion, individual activities in professional realms, and verbal and written communication. Majors only, 2nd year.

L ARCH 474/475 | Advanced Project Design (Design/build studio)
In this studio students are asked to collaborate with community members to learn about their community needs, values and vision. Based on this investigation students will develop conceptual designs evolve these early ideas in design development and develop construction drawings from which they will build the project. As is common in this unique model, the students will be asked to continually reevaluate their designs and details in the field. This course will combine participatory design, design development and construction and allow the student to participate in a project from inception through construction. This is a capstone course and 331, 332 and 433 are required as prerequisites.

L ARCH 476 | Professional Operations
[Description]
Practicum course for landscape architecture majors for internship and exposure to the profession with working experiences at various levels of professional endeavor. Student apprenticeship in selected private offices and public agencies. Credit/no credit only.

L ARCH 495 | Landscape Architectural Studies Abroad (1-10, max. 30)
Studies conducted under faculty supervision in various locations outside the United States.

L ARCH 498 | Special Projects (1-10, max. 30)
Special projects as arranged. Open to non-majors.

L ARCH 499 | Undergraduate Research (1-6, max. 6)
Individual or small-group studies pertaining to special problems, theories, or issues of landscape architecture and environmental issues.

L ARCH 503 | Community Design Studio
[ Autumn 09 New Orleans: Jefferson Parish Development ]
[ Winter 09 Seattle Chinatown: King Street Vision ]
[ Winter 08 New Orleans: Post Katrina Revitilization ]
[ Autumn 04 Alaska Field Studies: Design of Communities ]
[ Autumn 03 Town and Country: Envisioning Burlington, Saving Skagit Farmland ]
[ Spring 03 Community Heart: Alternative Futures for Homer, Alaska ]
[ Spring 02 Revitalization in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District ]
Design as social and community action. Service-learning studio with emphasis on the role of design in community building and placemaking in urban neighborhoods. Exploration of the social, economic, political and physical dimensions of urban design. Application of methods and approaches in citizen participation, community actions and political process.

L ARCH 504 | Landscape Urbanism
[ Winter 10 Public Spaces | Public Life for North Rainier Town Center ]
[ Autumn 08 Public Spaces | Public Life for South Downtown ]
[ Autumn 07 UW Tacoma Campus ]
[ Winter 06 Open Space Seattle ]
[ Winter 05 Landscape Urbanism Studio ]
[ Fall 00 Re-Creating the City: A New Vision for Urban Design and Stormwater ]
Application of landscape ecological theory to the design of urban environments. Focus is on the strategic design of urban infrastructure, including underground drainage systems, roads, parks, and transit systems, and on understanding the cumulative performance of urban sites.

L ARCH 507 | Landscape Art (Environmental Art Studio)
In this course students will be asked to develop precedent studies as a means to explore the area where environmental design and art begin to merge. This course asked students to consider the meaning of their actions, how they reflect their own and often the communities’ values and how each action is carefully considered as a part of the whole. The projects in this studio are typically based on the competition model and the students are expected to structure their proposals with that in mind. Presentation techniques will be illustrated both graphically and for oral presentation skills. This studio is often taught as an inter-disciplinary studio with faculty and students from fine arts, architecture and other disciplines. The studio focuses on creating presentation models and illustrative drawings. Open to graduate students or permission of instructor

L ARCH 550 | History of Modern Landscape Architecture
This course is a graduate version of LARC 353. Students are introduced to the history of landscape architecture as an art, discipline and profession in the U.S.A. in the 20th century. Landscape design in Europe, Japan, and South America is used as a counterpoint. The focus is on the intersection of landscape processes and prevailing social and economic, political and cultural factors and design theories and technical in shaping design practice. The rise of the profession of landscape architecture is examined in relationship to other design professions, such as Architecture and City Planning, and the Fine Arts, especially Painting and Sculpture. Methods include, lectures, weekly seminars, readings, midterm slide examination, term paper and final examination. Graduate majors and limited # of non-majors in related fields.

L ARCH 561 | Sustainability and Urban Landscapes
[Syllabi]
Discussion of theories and case studies that provide a framework for defining sustainable urban design as both a cultural and biophysical phenomenon. This course is intended to provide graduate students with the theoretical concepts necessary to undertake applied problems in urban design that require an understanding of some aspect of urban ecology. We will use a combination of readings, discussion, and student-led presentations or demonstrations to help each student understand the applications of theory to design, and to develop a conceptual vocabulary for ecological urban design. The central goal of the course is to help students gain insight into the relationships between design theory, theories of nature, and theories of sustainability.

L ARCH 570 | Scholarship & Inquiry
[Syllabi]
This course is the first of two required courses on the nature of scholarship and theory building in landscape architecture. Students investigate scholarship related to the design process, design critique, research and practice. Students then begin to frame their own scholarship for their master’s thesis.

L ARCH 571 Thesis Research Methods
This class is designed to expose students to the social science research methods used to conduct effective place-based research. Students learn how to conduct observations, in-depth interviews, surveys, archival research, post-occupancy evaluations, case studies, action research, and to interpret data. Students also explore possible thesis topics and methods of inquiry.

L ARCH 590 Seminar in Landscape Architecture (1-3, max. 12)
Advanced topics in landscape architecture with focus on unpublished areas of research.

L ARCH 598 Special Topics (1-6, max. 9)
[ 598a Design Activism ]
Systematic study of specialized regional landscape subject matters, including history, technology, implementation, and other topics depending on current interest/needs. Topics vary and are announced in the preceding quarter.

L ARCH 600 Independent Study or Research (*)

L ARCH 601 Internship (3-9, max. 9)

[Description]
Credit/no credit only.

L ARCH 700 Master’s Thesis (*)
[Syllabus Winter 09]

*Variable credit